A new, tougher energy efficiency scheme for air filters

Monday - 12th January 2015

January 1st 2015 saw the latest update to the Eurovent energy efficiency scheme come into effect. With a new A+ grade and tougher limits, Eurovent 4/21 is good news for customers and the industry alike.

Without wishing to pat ourselves on the back too much, it is testament to the development work undertaken by air filter manufacturers that the Eurovent energy efficiency grading scheme requires revision just three years after it was launched. 

Since the original 4/11 programme was introduced in 2012, great strides have been taken in air filter technology. The products available today are now so efficient in their energy usage that the existing grade structure is no longer appropriate. In fact, 20% of rated products fall into the current A classification. Of course, this devalues achieving the highest class and disguises which are the truly best options for customers.

To combat this, Eurovent 4/21 places a tougher limit on each grade, and is structured to place a percentage of products into each category, so only the very best filters will achieve the higher classifications.

 

Grade

A+

A

B

C

D

E

Proportion of Total

1%

5%

15%

30%

30%

19%

 

This holds two key benefits for buyers and end-users. Firstly, selecting a higher grade product will really mean you are choosing one of the most efficient options possible. Secondly, the new classification encourages greater competition and product development, meaning better air filters with better performance. This tougher Eurovent 4/21 will result in air filters that offer even lower operating costs and energy consumption.

 

Eurovent 4/21 - Energy Consumption by Filter Grade (kWh)

 

M5

M6

F7

F8

F9

A+

< 450

< 550

< 800

< 1000

< 1250

A

550

650

950

1200

1450

B

700

800

1200

1500

1900

C

950

1100

1700

2000

2600

D

1200

1400

2200

3000

4000

E

> 1200

> 1400

> 2200

> 3000

> 4000

 

The knock-on effect of this re-structuring is that around 14% of all products will be downgraded from an A class – even those that fall just outside the new limit. It should be remembered that the performance of these products has not deteriorated in any way and they still provide excellent energy efficiency. There is now just more room for improvement.

It is also worth highlighting the difference in energy efficiencies between each filter grade. An A+ rated F7 filter could consume the same amount of energy as a B rated M6, for example. So it is crucial to choose a product according to what is required; not to over-specify the filter grade or make a selection based upon purchase history. The key is choosing the filter that will deliver the correct level of air cleanliness at the lowest possible energy consumption. 

Eurovent 4/21 is a great help in doing so. 




Eurovent 4/21 – Rating air filtration energy efficiency


A filter consumes energy by creating a resistance to the air flow through it. This pressure drop means that the ventilation fan has to work harder in order to move the air. The effort required is directly related to the energy consumed by the fan motor. There are other contributory factors, but put simply, if the pressure drop of the filter is lowered, the fan works less hard and consumes less energy.

Eurovent 4/21 provides a uniform and validated method of testing, classifying and presenting the energy efficiency of an air filter, making comparison of different products simple.

Fine dust filters (M5 – F9 to EN 779) with a face dimension of 592 x 592 mm from participating (Eurovent certified) manufacturers are eligible to be rated.

Depending upon their expected energy consumption, products are then awarded one of six ratings from A+ (the best) to E (the worst).

 

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Did you know?

An additional 50 Pa of pressure drop will reduce the energy output of a gas turbine by approximately 0.1%. For example, a 420 MW turbine will lose 3,679,200 kWh per year assuming the machine operates 8,760 hours p.a.